Dating abuse stats by state

View the Additional Data by State Download the available state-level data on the percent of high school students experiencing harassment or bullying and dating violence, and state statutes on violence and employment, domestic violence, sexual violence, stalking, and gun ownership.The reported incidence of teen dating violence varies significantly across studies, yet even with variation the known prevalence rates establish it as a serious problem in the United States.Of these women, 69.5 percent reported experiencing intimate partner violence for the first time under the age of 24.Note: Intimate Partner Violence includes any form of physical violence, sexual violence, stalking, psychological aggression, and control of reproductive or sexual health.The survey indicated that, of those men, more than half had their first experience prior to age 24.Note: Intimate partner violence includes any form of physical violence, sexual violence, stalking, psychological aggression, and control of reproductive or sexual health.Over the last few decades, the nation has made considerable progress in addressing the violence and abuse many women experience at the hands of partners, acquaintances, and strangers.Despite this progress, threats to women’s safety continue to profoundly affect their economic security, health, civic engagement, and overall well-being.

Studies have found that intimate partner stalkers are more violent and threatening than non-intimate partner stalkers (Mohandie et al.

Read More See the Data Stalking is an unfortunately common crime in the United States.

A 2009 study by the Bureau of Justice Statistics found that during a 12-month period between 20, an estimated 3.3 million people aged 18 and older were stalked; the majority of victims were female, with those who are divorced or separated especially at risk (Catalano 2012b).

2006; Palarea et al.1999), and that partner stalkers tend to stalk their victims more frequently and more intensely than non-partner stalkers (Mohandie et al. Read More Domestic violence and abuse has profound effects on women’s employment and on workplaces.

One study estimates that each year women lose almost eight million days of paid work due to intimate partner violence (Max et al. For many women, the abusers’ actions lead to a decline in their job performance, causing them not only to miss work but to be late, need to leave early, or struggle to stay focused while at their jobs (Swanberg and Logan 2005).

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